Speed Bumps Versus Humps~Why are they not Everywhere?

Anyone working in municipal government  knows all about the tussle over speed humps or “bumps”, those wonderful “silent policemen”  installed by the City that slow vehicular traffic.  A speed hump is an area of raised pavement across a roadway, usually circular in shape, and is a gentler version of a speed bump, which has acute…

Metro Vancouver, We are Jealous of Winnipeg’s Woonerf!

There is a little more Dutch in Winnipeg these days as that city welcomes its first “Woonerf”. As reported in the Metro News this is a street innovation  for pedestrians before vehicles, and achieves “calming the street down through design”. A typical Dutch woonerf   The location of the woonerf  at John Hirsch Place used to contain an…

Drivers Pay Attention to the Pedestrian Zebras in the Streets of La Paz

Trying to get drivers to stop their vehicles for pedestrians crossing the road can be a trying experience.    The Atlantic Monthly describes the innovative attempts of the City of La Paz Bolivia in  changing driver behaviour in the streets, slowing traffic, and helping pedestrians survive. The “cebritas” program is a hybrid to that first introduced…

The Best Pedestrian Rest Areas are “Docking” in Parking Spaces

Little parklets are those exciting hacks of previous parking spaces morphing into things that well, ordinary people walking around can use. And one of the finest hacks as reported in City Lab is this absolutely brilliant reuse of a 24 foot sailboat now docked in a  Ballard neighbourhood street outside a Seattle donut shop. You are looking…

Peter Wohlwend, Walkability and Windsor Way

I have found that it is not city administration, policy and budgets that create great communities, but the concepts and ideas of the communities themselves. When planners talk about a three-legged stool of place making and the importance of policy, plan and then  community engagement, I have always seen it a bit differently. I think…

The Crossing That Can Kill You

The Globe and Mail has weighed in  with an article titled “Fatal Crossings” analyzing five years of data to ascertain why and how 163 pedestrians have died in the City of Toronto in the last five years. By the author Victor Biro’s calculations, that means that in Toronto on average  one pedestrian is hit on…

The Big Toll Paid By Vulnerable Road Users

There has been press about the important ramifications of reducing vehicular speed in cities and places to 30 kilometers per hour (km/h)  from 50 km/h. Studies show that vulnerable road users-those folks biking or walking without the metal frame of a vehicle to protect them-can better survive car crashes at those speeds. Pedestrians and cyclists…